Daisy Billowes

Daisy Billowes

Royal College of Arts

Podia, like most of the works in this large digital series and the ideas in my practice are an exploration of materiality; exploring the scope of the world - emphasising the tactility between the physical making and the digital realm. It is a reactionary practice that links photography with experience. 

 

 

 

There's a range within my practice - it's actively every day. It's like a sort of virus or something, something that's moving around. My work is about touching, and being. It's about the way things function - the way the world functions. My work, in simplest form, is about how we may think about something and how things are looked at, through photography and digital collage. My work creates this kind of strange relationship with scale, gesture and reality. I address the modernist tradition in a different sense where you look at anything in reality and understand that it has quality. I look at the mundane, whether it is a bit of the wall or the floor, everything from the ground up. There is no illusory space that's created as evidence of reality, and therefore everything has equal standing. 

 

 

 

It's a relationship to photography. My body of work functions like organic mechanisms of the everyday, heightening our awareness of the importance of the world. My work touches upon Modernism in a formal way. In abstraction - the shapes, the colours and lines that make up work. It always carries and emphasis on materials and processes. 

 

 

 

Disconcerting horizon lines with fragmented bodies drag you in, push you out. Morphed digital images interact with the descriptive marks. A rawness through blind drawings and wandering pencil marks - a freshness of leading movements that pulse - describing the surrounding landscape of a city, space, or experience. It is an instinctive exploring. A digital exploring through photographic material of history, people, time and space. 

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